How To Beat The Heat – 3 Running Tips

Get out of your head and go into your body

As the temperatures rise it gets easier to talk ourselves out of going outside to run. Often I hear ‘I’ll have to stop running now it’s getting hot’ or ‘it’s too hot to run outside’.

To beat the heat, think about the why

Running outdoors brings so much more than better fitness. Spending time outdoors, whether it’s out in the mountains, along the beach track or simply around the street where you live, helps us feel happier. It provides the space to let the rush of day-to-day life be put on hold- even if it is only for 30 minutes. Resulting in us feeling calmer, more relaxed and in return – more motivated to choose healthier lifestyle choices.

3 Top Tips To Beating The Heat & Running Outdoors:

  1. Hydration

Hydration is essential at all times of year; however, it is even more essential when the heat is up as we sweat a lot more.

As a recommendation;

  • Increase your daily amount from 2 litres a day to up to 3-5 litres a day, depending on your size and how much physical movement and sweating you do.
  • To get the most out of drinking water, it is recommended to sip water throughout the day, not down it in one go – this can actually cause you more harm than good.
  • Start wearing a camel pack on your runs, continue to sip water during training too.
  • We lose electrolytes in our sweat, therefore adding an electrolyte tablet to 500ml of water a day will help you replace the excess you are losing by running in the heat. Helping prevent fluid retention and muscle cramping.
  • Enjoy fresh hydrating foods such as fruits and vegetables with each meal, here are 5 to get you started:
  1. Cumber – water content 96.7%
  2. Iceberg lettuce – water content 95.6%
  3. Celery – water content 95.4%
  4. Tomatoes – water content 94.5%
  5. Strawberries – water content 91%

TOP TIP: For running longer distances, fill up a bottle of water and freeze, take with you on your run and once it’s melted you will be ready for a nice, cold refreshing drink!

  1. Timings & Locations

Be smart and choose to run at the coolest times of the day and in the coolest settings.

Getting up at 4am may seem like drastic action, however it can make a huge difference to your running experience. Not only is it cooler, the sun is not beating down on you and you get to enjoy the sunrise.

Using the evenings has the advantage that it will always be getting cooler (rather than hotter in the mornings). Watch the sun-set or wait until the sun has gone down completely.

Running where there is shade or a breeze will also help, mix up your running route by running out in the mountains and by the sea.

  1. Focus On Your Health Not Your PB’s

Keep your heart happy and take the pace down a little or run for less distance – especially if it is your first time running in higher temperatures. Best way to do this is to take along a friend, run at a pace where you can still have a conversation!

Wear a heart rate monitor and check-in with your numbers – remember to listen to your body, it’s never wrong.

“You can keep running outside when the temperature increases – listen to your body and adapt.”

However, it’s important to keep in mind when it comes to exercise – how much and which types, will benefit you most?

Not training for an event?

Perhaps this is the time of year to try out some new forms of exercise. Experiment with Cross Fit, in-door climbing, yoga, RPM – your options are endless. When you find what works for you in the summer heat, you’ll be more likely to do it consistently and reap the benefits, including increased energy and positivity.

Interested in joining my #morethanmiles running group? Please get in touch by emailing me at heidi@heidijonescoaching.com

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A health coach supports you in identifying and overcoming the obstacles that are holding you back to living your healthiest and happiest lifestyle. If you would like to know more about the health coaching program or in need of an accountability partner, get in touch by emailing heidi@heidijonescoaching.com

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